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Past Residency Themes


Flint & Steel: sparking cross-disciplinary combustion
Flint and Steel are five week residencies designed to allow artists to join forces with invested academic partners. Each artist will be paired with a Tulane University faculty member to inspire each other in the development of new work, to excite the public, and to ignite social change. Addressing the artists' desire to be more effective and have longer lasting impact with their outreach, these collaborations will empower the artistic practice with scholarship, student manpower and academic resources from Tulane. We ask artists to describe in detail how the opportunity will affect their work, to propose a public component to their residency and to suggest ways in which they will engage with the local community.  Flint & Steel Residencies are sponsored thanks to generous support of The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation and Lambent Foundation. This program is supported by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. The grant is administered through the Arts Council of New Orleans. The Artists-in-Residence program is supported by a grant from the New Orleans Theatre Association (NOTA).


Tulane Scholarly Retreats: For Faculty, Post-doctoral Fellows, Graduate Students
A Studio in the Woods and the Tulane-Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research seek to enhance and support the scholarship and creativity of Tulane faculty and trainees by awarding one- to two-week residencies during Fall 2014. These residencies will provide a retreat for faculty and trainees across disciplines to work on a discrete project or scholarly pursuit that can be new or complementary to ongoing work. This opportunity may be considered similar to an artist residency, writing fellowship or grant-in-aid.

Ebb & Flow
The series titled Ebb & Flow: Dialogues between art and water is the evolution of our Changing Landscapes residencies and reflects a movement to refocus our artists’ energies from the post-Hurricane Katrina landscape to the worldwide importance of water as underscored by the 2010 oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. The call was open to artists of all disciplines who have demonstrated an established dialogue with environmental issues and a commitment to seeking and plumbing new depths. Ebb & Flow is based on the premise that Southern Louisiana can be seen as a microcosm of the global environment, manifesting both the challenges and possibilities inherent in human interaction with urban and natural ecosystems. We asked artists to describe in detail how the region would affect their work, to propose a public component to their residency and to suggest ways in which they would engage with the local community. Artists were awarded a stipend as well as funding for materials.  Ebb & Flow Residencies are sponsored thanks to generous support of The Surdna Foundation and The National Endowment for the Arts. This program is supported by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. The grant is administered through the Arts Council of New Orleans. The Artists-in-Residence program is supported by a grant from the New Orleans Theatre Association (NOTA).

Changing Landscapes Residencies
At the close of the 2008 deadline, we noticed a marked decrease in artists applying for Restoration Residencies, indicating to us that New Orleans and Gulf Coast artists were in a more stable position than they had been since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Inspired by the drastic upheaval in our local ecology Changing Landscapes was formed, a six-week residency based on the premise that Southern Louisiana can be seen as a microcosm of the global environment, manifesting both the challenges and possibilities inherent in human interaction with the natural world. Artists were awarded a stipend as well as funding for materials. Supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. This program is supported by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. The grant is administered through the Arts Council of New Orleans. Funding has also been provided by the Ford Foundation, Rosamary Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, a Federal Agency.

Restoration Residencies: Restoring New Orleans One Artist at a Time
In response to the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina, A Studio in the Woods created month-long Restoration Residencies for New Orleans visual artists, musicians, composers, writers and performing artists who lost their homes, studios and/or work in the hurricane and were either displaced in other cities and communities or back home in New Orleans without resources. Eligible artists needed to have residency (or had residency and intended to return) in the New Orleans metropolitan area. These residencies provided lodging, food, studio space and a stipend. Restoration Residencies were funded in part by the Alliance of Artists Communities, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Ford Foundation, Acadiana Arts Council, Allen Gerson of the Art and Artists Restoration Fund, New Orleans Our Hometown, and Howard Read of the Cheim & Read Gallery. Supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a Federal Agency.

Special Invitation Residencies
Special Invitation Residencies are provided when two needs can be met in one residency—the need of a particular artist to have the opportunity for self-restoration and creation of new work, and the wider community's benefit from that new work. One example was the 2003–2004 residency of Dr. Michael White in which he let go of all his regular obligations in order to rest, study early jazz masters, and to compose new songs. The subsequent performance of his new recordings in a public concert attended by over 1000 people and titled “Jazz out of the Woods” stands as a significant musical contribution to the wider community and to the roots of this art form. Another example lies in the mini-residencies periodically awarded by the Tulane University English Department to outstanding creative writing graduates such as Ada Bidiuc (2008), Jean-Luc Delafontaine (2011), and James Langlois (2007).

River Residencies
River Residencies honor the Mississippi River, a magnificent body of water that has inspired authors, musicians, artists, historians, and playwrights for over a century yet today is challenged by pollution and containment. River Residencies provide sustained quality work time in contact with the Mississippi; time in which one can experience and study the river using it as a catalyst to create art that contributes to our awareness of the river, its needs and its gifts to all life. Funded by the Louisiana Division of the Arts and the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research with a grant from the Aron Foundation Charitable Trust.

Open Call Residencies
Many of the early residencies were Open Call, meaning that they were available to all categories of artists—visual, literary, musical, and performing—and that they were also open to artists at any stage of their careers —emerging artists, well-established artists, art teachers and artists returning to former careers in the arts. These residencies were publicly announced and available to artists from anywhere in the world. These residencies typically lasted one month and were awarded based on the seriousness of purpose, harmony with the mission of A Studio in the Woods, quality of the art, and the creative use of the studio’s time, space, and natural environment. Artists were encouraged to interact with the public, some elected to have an informal community dinner at the end of their residency while others gave readings, held open studios to exhibit work created while in residency, or gave informal talks on their work and the residency experience.
 

Pilot Residencies
The Pilot Residencies were our very first residencies and were conducted unofficially before A Studio in the Woods became a nonprofit artists’ community. They were unadvertised and served as learning experiences for the founders and staff to find out whether residencies in these buildings and natural environment were in fact constructive experiences for artists and logistically possible for those who live and work in the woods. The pilot residents were recommended by board members as artists willing and even enthusiastic to test out the facilities, hospitality, surroundings, and ambience. Each pilot artist was provided with food, lodging, and a studio as well as informal assistance with transportation when necessary.